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  • The Little Things

    Randi #4


    The other day I was observing some fairly new athletes lift as another coach was giving them instructions on how to properly perform a deadlift. I watched as he was going over step by step and correcting along the way and the cues he was giving them. Each time they seemed to improve on form and weight. Once the weight started to get pretty challenging you could see their whole demeanor change. You could see the intimidation set in. You could see their confidence slowly slipping away each time there was weight added. As I stood there still observing, they both failed the lift they attempted next. Frustration and disappointment was all over their faces. I knew exactly how they felt. I stepped in and told them that you can't let the bar and weights intimidate you. You have to lift with confidence. You can't be afraid to fail. Failing leads to success. You have to focus on a few things during the lift and nothing else. When you walk up to the bar you better be ready to give it a solid effort otherwise your wasting your time. It's going to be tough, it's heavy, but that's how you get better. They both successfully lifted their next lift. Was it perfect? No and it doesn't have to be. What I saw was a smile on both of their faces and confidence that was regained. Your workouts change when you approach them with confidence. Don't let objects, numbers, weights, reps, times, scores intimidate you. You focus on you and give a solid effort and work on the little things.

    Randi Stevens CrossFit Impressions

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • My Inspiration


    I was recently Inpired by a an article by Janne Robinson called, "F*** Everything that Doesn't Make You Happy". I love this.


    In life we have choice. We really do.


    If you are not happy change it.


    If your friends suck, "break-up" with them.


    If you don't like any part of how you are living them change that.




    Don't complain and bring yourself down. That is the worst.


    In my heart I recently have decided to go after what I want. That involved changing gyms and environments so that the growth in me was fed. But you know what, I don't care what "nay-Sayers" say, I mean I'm great. I'm happy. I have an awesome husband and Jesus is showing me awesome new things everyday. Not mention I am so in love with my job.


    So why wouldn't I do what I love?

    Megan Lynn Adams CrossFit Cedar Park

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • What Now?



    Now that regionals is over, my off season begins. It is always a good experience and always a journey for myself. I am always learning and growing. I've been doing Crossfit for 3 years now. 2016 was also my third year at regionals. Yes, my first year doing Crossfit, I went to regionals. My first year at regionals in 2014 was unbelievable. It was nerve-wracking and exciting. I was a rookie and had just learned a lot of movements in Crossfit. I wasn't expecting much from myself out on the floor but I was ready to see how well I could move with the girls. My background in sports has helped me a lot in Crossfit. I have done gymnastics, track and field, pole vault, cross country, wrestling, power lifting and bodybuilding. My background is not an excuse. I've realized how bad in shape I was, despite all the sports I've done. I was like starting all over from scratch but I loved it! The challenge is what I enjoy. I've been an athlete all my life and I love the feeling and craving to be better. 2016, regionals in Dallas, which was my third year goes to prove I am not ashamed to say that I was a little disappointed. My dreams is to make it to the Games one day. And maybe I had my hopes a little too high, but once again I experienced all my weaknesses. I WILL continue to work on them. Like I always tell my coach Marcus, some day's I'm the hammer and some days I'm the nail. BUT, what really opened up my eyes was on the first day I was down to 30th place and all I could think about was to pick it back up. On the second and third day I went back up 15 spots. That had to say something? I didn't leave angry after all, I was proud of myself. Who knew I could jump back up to top 20? This is not the end of me, this only makes me more hungry!

    Rachel Garibay CrossFit 915

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • Feedback



    This is one of my favorite new things. The art of feedback is one of the toughest lessons but as you approach giving/ receiving it with openness and no emotion, it becomes easier.


    What feedback is, is this:


    Context- Impact-Commitment


    Context: What was seen or said.


    Impact: What was the impact it had on you? Only you. (No 'I feel'). How did what was done directly impact you? Be honest.


    Commitment: What is the commitment you are making to the person you are giving feedback to? (consider this: you care enough to tell the other person, with love, what was done).


    I see a lot of conflict that could be resolved if you simply take your emotion out. When you do that you can have empowering moments with whoever you are giving feedback to. This is how we get better in life and personal or business relationships.

    Megan Adams CrossFit Cedar Park

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • Goals



    When I have a new athlete come through the door one of the first things I ask them is what they would like to achieve. A few have a quick response and know exactly what they want and a few look at me like they have never been asked that question before. Goals are important in your growth as a person and as an athlete. I try to encourage everyone to train with a purpose. They can be simple and small to start and then gradually increase and become one big picture. Goals set the stage for the future. Goals remind you of the "why" on days you don't want to be there. Achieving goals gives you confidence. Failing reminds you that it won't always be easy. Goals give you a purpose and a desire to better yourself. Set goals and crush them! Never settle and always stay hungry for more.

    Randi Stevens Crossfit Impressions

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • "Strict Strength"

    Justin Adams1


    An often overlooked but drastically important piece to functional fitness training is strict gymnastics strength. We are seeing this more in high level competitions (Legless rope climbs, strict HSPU, strict muscle-ups), but potentially even more important than having the skill for competition is injury prevention.


    Dynamic gymnastics movements like the Kipping hspu or the butterfly pull-up put an exponential amount of force on your shoulder girdle. If you do not have the strict foundation behind the movements it is a recipe for injury.


    Here is the basic template I use for all my strict gymnastics work. It is called the range method. The premise is you do three sets of Max effort sets up to 10 reps. Once you have accomplished 3x10 reps unbroken, you make the movement more difficult then repeat.


    Example 1: Strict Pull-ups (medium band) Set 1: 10 reps Set 2: 8 reps Set 3:7 reps In this example you would stay on the same level of difficulty for another week.


    Example 2: Strict Pull-ups (medium band) Set 1: 10 reps Set 2: 10 reps Set 3: 10 reps In this example you have graduated the "range". The following week you would make it more difficult by moving down to a smaller size band.


    You should start at a range difficulty that you know you can get 5-7 quality reps. Starting off with a range that is too difficult will slow your progress. Volume will create results.


    Here are ways to scale common strict gymnastics movements: Hspu: push-ups, box hspu or strict dumbbell press Pull-up: banded pull-ups Ring Dips: box dips or ring dips with feet elevated on a box. (Note: do not use bands for ring dips. Unlike the band on a pullup bar where the band helps you most on the least difficult part of the movement, a band on rings will help you most at the most difficult part. It will slow progress and create bad habits.)


    I like to alternate days on pushing movements (ring dips, hspu) and pulling movements (pullups, muscle ups, rope climbs) so as to not overwork on muscle group. Also as you progress through this make mobility a priority. This can overload your shoulders if you do not properly take care of them!


    I hope this helps! Go get strong!!!

    Justin Adams Woodward CrossFit

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • Fear


    Eleanor Roosevelt said, " you must do the thing that you cannot do"

    This is so good. Living In choice and choosing to rise above your daily challenges is an every day struggle. Consider this: if you wake up, look fear in the eyes and do one thing a day that scares you, how much happier and fulfilled would you be?

    Personally this one hits home. In the world of functional fitness I feel like there is a challenge in a every workout that I don't want to do. Why? Ask myself why all the time! A lot of the time I don't push as hard as I need to because I am scared. Silly right? My biggest fear is myself?! Well when it comes down to it pushing that voice in my head aside and doing has changed the game. What I mean by that is this: when you don't think, and trust your training the results will pay off. If I think I'm going to suck at muscle ups today, well I probably will. But if I say to myself "hey you got this you can always do one more rep" my mindset changes. I am now living in choice. I am choosing to rise above and be better.

    What is the one thing you think you cannot do? Why can't you do it? What if you lived in possibility and nothing could hold you back?

    Go. Be great. Much love,

    Megan Adams Woodward Crossfit

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • Do Not Fear Failure


    What separates the best athletes in the world from the average athletes? Talent? Sure that plays a role but it's not the main factor. Genetics? Yes, this also plays a role but it is not the main factor either. What separates the average CrossFit athlete from the regional/games athlete is their work ethic and tenacity to never settle or give up.

    To reach the level needed to compete at regionals or the games you must endure many trails and tribulations along your fitness journey. You will have far more failures than successes. To the average athlete this would hinder them and/or discourage them. The high level athlete knows that you must fail in order to grow. To become a better athlete you must push yourself to the limit which sometimes will involve failure.

    Once I learned that I must fail to succeed my training completely changed. When something caused me to fail instead of discouraging me it fired me up. Failure is what pushes me, it makes me strive to become a better athlete. Just imagine how boring training would be if you never had failure? Achieving a PR would not carry the weight nor the feeling that it does if failure did not exist.

    To take a line from Chris Spealler's tattoo, "I am not ashamed to fail". Do not be ashamed to fail! Look at failure as a challenge and use it to push you. When you fail it means you are one step closer to success.

    -Ben Stevens CrossFit Impressions

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • Island

    Justin Adams2

    A wise man once told me, "Motivation is like being on a desert island.  You will only have what you bring with you."

    Motivation is a choice. It does not just magically show up. You choose to bring it every time you go after something.  That something can be training, career, relationships, or anything else you want to go after.

    You make the decision that what you want is more important than sitting back and doing nothing.  You chose that doing work for a purpose is more important than comfort of the moment.  You decide that this is WORTH IT.

    You have to decide to carry that motivation with you wherever you go.  It has to be with you always if you truly want to succeed.

    Everyday you step into a new deserted island.  What do you chose to bring?

    -Justin Adams Woodward Crossfit

    RxClubhouse Athlete

  • What's Next?


    "Every year CrossFit athletes from all over the world prepare for the biggest test of fitness, The Open. The five week long test of your fitness showcases your strengths and your weaknesses. Any athlete from your most elite to your everyday soccer mom is allowed to participate.

    The Open is so much more than just a test of your fitness. It is a time to celebrate victories, whether they are small or large. It is a time to learn about yourself as an athlete and also from others. It is a time to gather as a community to encourage, push and have fun together. The Open means something different to everyone. Whether you are happy with your performance or not I encourage you to take a few days if you haven’t already and reevaluate each workout. Why? To become a better athlete. Take a few days and reflect on the “WHY” you do CrossFit. Take some time and breakdown each workout. Look at your scorecard, your pictures and or video if you have one of each workout. What did you do wrong? What needs to improve? How did you feel? How did you prepare? What did you do that was awesome?

    You MUST find something that you did awesome at. Whether it's you kept good form or you Pr’d or you did something more efficient than before. This is very important for your training in the future. You cannot look at The Open in an all negative way for you will set yourself up for frustration and loss of desire in future training. Write these things down, and set some goals small and large. Work on something such as skills, technique, mobility, and or nutrition every single day. You don’t have to spend all of your free time obsessing over this stuff. Enjoy life but when you are in the gym be in the moment and focus on those goals. Be sure to check out RxClubhouse for all of your recovery and nutritional needs at"

    -Randi Stevens Crossfit Impressions

    RxClubhouse Athlete

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